Yi Yi

“I can only see what’s in front, not what’s behind, so I can only know half of the truth, right?”

Even though Edward Yang’s final film, “Yi Yi, A One and a Two,” was critically acclaimed, it is a long film and requires patience, the right frame of mind when watching, or something similar to really connect with the film. At just shy of three hours and exploring pretty much every aspect of life in one Taipei family over the course of a year, it’s certainly something that can tax some viewers, but for those who click with it, it’s a masterful, powerful, poignant film. Join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we continue our Foreign Language film series with this Taiwanese entry from 2000. We discuss what works so well in this film… for Andy and what doesn’t work at all in this film… for Pete, having very interesting discourse back and forth in the struggle to explore this film. We talk about the characters in the film and what they’re bringing to the story, most notably the young Yang-Yang who ends up providing the most poignant elements of the story. We chat about the New Wave of Taiwanese cinema in the 80s-90s when Yang was beginning his career and how that group and their sensibilities informed Yang’s filmmaking. And we discuss what works and doesn’t work for us in the cinematography and the editing, and why it works so well for Andy but not Pete. It’s a fascinating exploration into a film that clearly works for some but not others, and one that’s full of fun facts and interesting arguments. Watch the movie and tune in!

Film Sundries

Trailers of the Week