Post Mortem

"I’ll talk to them. I have a position now."

Pablo Larraín was born when Pinochet was already in power but the military coup that brought Pinochet to power always fascinated him, largely because it wasn’t something that was discussed until after the dictatorship ended in 1990. On top of that, Larraín became fascinated by the little people who got wrapped up in big moments in history. One that piqued his curiosity was a man named Mario who happened to be a coroner’s assistant helping in the room during the autopsy of President Salvador Allende, the former Chilean leader before Pinochet’s rise. Larraín became fascinated by this moment of history told through this character’s eyes. And thus, Post Mortem was born.

Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our ‘Pablo Larraín’s Unintentional Trilogy’ series with his 2010 film Post Mortem. We talk about why this film, while not as unenjoyable to watch as Tony Manero, still is difficult to watch, and it’s largely about the dislikeable protagonist Mario played well by Alfredo Castro. We debate what Larraín is doing here and if perhaps he’s aiming for too much symbolism in these stories with such despicable characters. We chat about the political environment in Chile at the time and how fascinated we were by those elements. We talk about the crazy Russian lenses they used to film this movie and how much we ended up liking the hypnotic look, even if it took us a while to get there. We chat about Antonia Zegers and Amparo Noguera and some of the powerful moments the two of them provide in the film. And we look at the last shot of the film and the potential power in it. 

As it turns out, Larraín does play with the timeline after all! This shot comes about 14 minutes into the film.

It’s a really interesting film that unfortunately still struggles with an unlikeable protagonist but gets away with it because the political nature of the film and the natural intrigue it brings. Check out the movie then tune in!

Film Sundries

Trailers of the Week

  • Andy's Trailer: It Comes at Night — "A24 is a distributor I’m watching now and every time I see their logo before a trailer, I instantly put it on my watch list. This would’ve been an easy one anyway with the horror element that naturally draws me in. Creepy story. Great look. Interesting scares. The logo sold me but the trailer had me begging for more."
  • Pete's Trailer: Score: A Film Music Documentary — “Clearly a passion project from filmmaker Matt Schrader, Score takes us behind the scenes of the greatest film composers of our time. It’s been floating around festivals for some time, but looks like we’ll finally get our ears on it in June. Bonus: At no point do these composers spit up black goo on one another, as in Andy’s trailer this week.“