Blindness

"Either the blindness spread the panic or the panic spread the blindness."

When Fernando Meirelles showed his 2008 film Blindness to José Saramago, the author of the original book upon which it was based, Saramago loved it. Unfortunately for them, neither critics nor audiences connected with the allegorical film. It’s a tough watch with questionable character motivations and a fairly depressing world view. But some people still really love it, creating quite a variety of reactions to the film well worth talking about. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we discuss the penultimate film in our Disease Films series, Meirelles’ Blindness

We talk about why the film worked for Andy but didn’t work for Pete and how, for both, there are still gaping problems that should’ve been worked out. We discuss the cinematography and production design and how they work together to really create an interesting world on film, even if there are elements one could call on the nose. We dig into the technical side of the VistaVision camera and why the production team likely used it for filming. We look at the actors – from Julianne Moore and Mark Ruffalo to Danny Glover and Gael García Bernal – and what they’re all bringing to the table. And we look at the variety of locations they filmed at including Brazil, Canada and Uruguay. 

It’s a problematic film that some people may like while others may hate, but it is an interesting allegory all the same and certainly fun to talk about. So check it out and tune in!

Film Sundries

Trailers of the Week

Andy's Trailer: Allied — "It’s just a teaser, but I’ll see anything Robert Zemeckis does. The fact that it’s a WWII story written by Steven Knight with Brad Pitt and Marion Cotillard starring is just icing on the cake.”

Pete's Trailer: The Good Neighbor — "James Caan is incredibly scary. Just, as a person. He’s a scary person. In fact, there were moments that I actually thought Kathy Bates was the victim that one time. Remember that? He’s that scary of a guy. And now he’s playing the role of the scary guy in a SUPER-Rear-Window-vibed film. I’ll see this, and probably regret it for so many reasons."