Posts Tagged ‘Film Noir’

Touch of Evil

“He was some kind of a man. What does it matter what you say about people?” Orson Welles never was one who could direct in the Hollywood studio system without a hitch, and his last studio picture he directed, 1958’s “Touch of Evil,” stands testament to that fact. While the shoot itself went well, the…

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Ace in the Hole

“Bad news sells best, because good news is no news.” From “Double Indemnity” in 1944 through “The Apartment” in 1960 (maybe even “One, Two, Three” in ’61), Billy Wilder really hit his stride. His films were all over the map genre-wise, yet he showed how great a director he was because they’re all incredibly memorable.…

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Out of the Past

“You’re like a leaf that the wind blows from one gutter to another.” The two films most often cited as the ultimate representations of film noir are Billy Wilder’s 1944 film “Double Indemnity” and Jacques Tourneur’s 1947 film “Out of the Past.” Tourneur’s film gives us Robert Mitchum at his laconic best, Jane Greer at…

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Scarlet Street

“I’ve wanted to laugh in your face ever since I first met you. You’re old and ugly and I’m sick of you! Sick! Sick! Sick!” Fritz Lang may have often had conflicts with his producers, but when he turned out a great film, he made so great that it’s easy to look past his argumentative…

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Detour

“That’s life. Whichever way you turn, fate sticks out a foot to trip you.” There are good films noir and there are bad films noir. But rarely do you have a case like 1945’s “Detour,” directed by Edgar G. Ulmer, where the poor quality that would make it a bad film could actually be construed…

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Double Indemnity

“How could I have known that murder sometimes smells like honeysuckle?” Nobody knew they were making films noir when the genre started in the 40s — it wasn’t until much later when the French dubbed this new run of American films that had a darker bent with snappy dialogue, lots of shadows and femme fatales…

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